Jacqueline Hoppenreijs recently joined the NRRV research group. Here she writes about her previous work and what she intends to do as a PhD student at Karlstad University:

Hej! I’m Jacqueline Hoppenreijs and I recently started my PhD in the NRRV group at Karlstad University. During my MSc, which I did at the Department of Environmental Science at Radboud University in Nijmegen (the Netherlands) and the Department of Ecology at SLU Uppsala, I worked on different species groups: plants, birds and insects and wrote two theses. The first one, with fellow student Bas van Lith, explored possibilities for bird population restoration on the Indonesian island of Java, using historical sources on bird population development and land use change over the course of a century. During the second one, I studied the importance of different man-made habitat types for pollinators in Sweden, over the course of a season.

 

Bas and I birdwatching in Rancaekek, by Fachmi Azhar Aji

 

Despite studying quite different time frames and taxa, biodiversity, ecosystem functioning and conservation have been recurring themes. Coming from the overpopulated Netherlands, I find myself very interested in the interface of human society and nature, and more specifically nature restoration, conservation efforts and their ethical aspects.

As a junior researcher at the Department of Animal Ecology & Physiology at Radboud University, I dove a bit deeper in the influence that human actions can have on the natural world. I worked in Rob Leuven’s group to identify the potential risks of invasive (alien) species in horticulture, biological control and food forestry.

As from April 2019, I’m working with Lutz Eckstein and Lovisa Lind. We’re focusing on both fundamental and applied aspects of plant ecology and I’m looking forward to unravel the mechanisms that drive plant dispersal and community composition in boreal riparian zones. Next to that, I’m excited to be part of an active education environment and the passionate group of researchers that forms the NRRV, and can’t wait to meet the rest of Karlstad’s community!

 

Vegetation sampling on Omey Island, by Joop Schaminée

European eel, Anguilla anguilla. Photo: Jörgen Wiklund

Karlstad University has an opening for a PhD position in aquatic conservation biology. The project will focus on “Resolving production bottlenecks for the European eel”. Conserving biodiversity is one of the major challenges in applied aquatic ecology. The European eel functions as a flagship species in marine and freshwater conservation, and its population collapse is of major concern for ecologists, fishers and managers.

The aim of the PhD project is to identify:

(i) relationships between yellow eel habitat use, growth, behavior and survival.

(ii) effects of habitat characteristics and the surrounding landscape on eel large-scale movements within freshwater systems.

(iii) functioning downstream passage solutions at hydropower plants for a wide range of silver eel phenotypes.

The position is full-time for four years. Doctoral students may also be assigned departmental duties, such as teaching, which will extend the period of employment accordingly.

Read more and apply for the position here.

Last day to apply is 5 June 2019.

Seminarium om modellering

Posted by Karl Filipsson | Seminar

På fredag 15 mars kommer Ola Nordblom från DHI (som arbetar med vattenmiljöer, med tonvikt på avancerad tillämpning av beräkningsmodeller) till Karlstads universitet. Klockan 11:00 kommer det att vara ett öppet diskussionsseminarium, där (1) Ola presenterar DHIs verksamhet och hur ekologisk forskning kan vara av intresse för deras framtida projekt, och (2) forskargruppen NRRV presenterar sina forskningsområden och framtida behov av samarbeten kring modellering.

Seminariet kommer hållas i rum 5F416.

Forskare, doktorander och studenter är välkomna!

Raft spider (Dolomedes sp.)

A PhD position in biology (community and food web ecology) is now open for application at Karlstad University. The project will focus on evaluating the ability of forested buffer strips to maintain cross boundaries fluxes between streams and riparian ecosystems.

The aim of the PhD project is to (i) analyse the link between riparian forest buffer width and functional diversity of riparian predator communities, (ii) define optimal buffer zones for conservation of riparian ecosystem functions, based on food web complexity and ecological niches (using stable isotopes) and (iii) use DNA-barcoding to study variation in prey preference with varying buffer width and test stable isotopes as a tool to assess riparian ecosystem functions in forestry affected landscapes.

The position is full time for four years but may be extended if department duties such as teaching (maximum 20 % of a full-time position) are included.

Last application date is 14 March 2019.

Read more and apply for the position here!

 

River Mörrumsån, Sweden

 

 

Two PhD positions (1: vegetation ecology, 2: ecosystem function/host-parasite interactions) are now open for applicants at Karlstad University. Both positions are full time for five years within the River Ecology and Management (NRRV) research group and include 80 % research and 20 % department duties (mainly teaching).

The applications for both positions close on 31 January 2019.

 

PhD position in vegetation ecology

River Klarälven, Värmland

The project will study which factors control diaspore dispersal and plant community composition along boreal streams, which in turn may have cascading effects on functional plant diversity and ecosystem functioning. The specific research questions to be addressed will be decided in consultation with the candidate. Areas of particular interest are (1) the effects of local and landscape-scale factors for plant species composition and diversity and cascading effects on ecosystem functioning and (2) studies of factors promoting or constraining plant dispersal along streams.

Read more and apply for the position here!

 

Ecosystem function/host-parasite interactions

The position will focus on either the role of mussels for ecosystem function or host-parasite interactions. Areas of interest are (1) the role of mussels for stream ecosystem function and (2) host-parasite interactions between mussels and their host fish. The specific research questions to be addressed will be decided in consultation with the candidate.

Read more and apply for the position here!

Job: Project assistant

Posted by Karl Filipsson | Jobs

River Klarälven, Värmland, Sweden

A position as project assistant (6 months with possible extension) in NRRV is open for application at Karlstad University. The position involves fieldwork, laboratory work and data analysis within the fields of fish ecology, stream ecology and river rehabilitation.

Read more and apply for the position here, last day of application is 7 May 2018.

A postdoc position in the ecology of river restoration is open for applications at Karlstad University: “The main duty of the position is to conduct research on the effects of dam removal and the installation of fish-friendly turbines on river connectivity and ecology. Intact river connectivity is essential for many organisms in running water, and especially so for organisms that move between different habitats to complete their life cycle, such as many migratory fish species. Many rivers are modified by dams such as hydroelectric power plants. Dams disconnect river stretches and habitats, thereby reducing dispersal and migration possibilities for fish, benthos, and plants, with negative effects on individuals, populations, and communities. The post-doctoral candidate will be expected to evaluate the effects of complete dam removal and installation of fish-friendly turbines as measures to improve connectivity in rivers.“. The deadline for applying is February 28. Read the full announcement here:

Post-doctoral Research Fellow in Ecology of River Restoration: Dam Removal and fish-friendly Turbine

As advertised previously, NRRV at Karlstad University, also has two additional openings for full-time post-doctoral research fellows and one opening for a PhD-student (deadline February 10). Read full announcements for these positions here:

Post-doctoral Research Fellow in Aquatic-Terrestrial Linkages

Post-doctoral Research Fellow in Ecology of River Connectivity.

PhD position in Global climate change and winter ecology

removalThere are currently two openings for full-time post-doctoral research fellows with the River Ecology and Management (NRRV) group at the Department of Environmental and Life Sciences, Karlstad University  One position is in the field of stream-riparian ecology with focus on the reciprocal interactions and linkages between aquatic and terrestrial habitats. The other position is on river connectivity with focus on rehabilitation, management and development strategies. Read full position announcements here:

Post-doctoral Research Fellow in Aquatic-Terrestrial Linkages

Post-doctoral Research Fellow in Ecology of River Connectivity

Last application date is February 10.

 

PENNRRV (eng. River Ecology and Management Research Group) is presented in the Pan European Networks’ publication Science and Technology:

“The River Ecology and Management Research Group at Karlstad University, Sweden, develops innovative solutions to environmental problems in direct collaboration with stakeholders such as municipalities, NGOs and industry.

The River Ecology and Management Research Group, consisting of four full professors, six researchers and seven graduate students, works towards advancing the understanding of freshwater ecosystems and their surrounding landscapes. The group conducts both basic and applied ecological research in all types of fluvial environments, from small streams to large rivers. According to the United Nation’s Millennium Ecosystem Assessment, freshwaters are among the world’s most imperilled habitats, and the past 50 years have seen drastic declines in freshwater biodiversity and ecosystem services due to anthropogenic habitat alteration. Much of the group’s research focuses on understanding the effects of flow modification and habitat loss on responses by different organisms, and applying results to solve real-world, challenge-driven problems. Studies are conducted in countries across the globe, solving environmental problems in transdisciplinary settings. Our 250m2, state-of-the-art fluvial aquarium facility enables us to experimentally identify mechanistic, behavioural responses to environmental conditions. Recent large research projects focus on fish passage in regulated rivers, forest-stream interactions, fish winter ecology, and fish-mussel host-parasite interactions…”.

Read the whole article here.