Associate Professor Johan Watz from Karlstad University’s River Ecology Management Research Group (RivEm) and others have recently published a review article entitled Atlantic salmon in regulated rivers: Understanding river management through the ecosystem services lens. The authors synthesized peer-reviewed literature (related to the effects of hydropower on ecosystem services of Atlantic salmon in regulated rivers throughout its native range) to understand how Atlantic salmon conservation has been addressed within the ecosystem services framework. The paper is published open access and can be found at:https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/faf.12628


Professor John Piccolo was involved in two recently published articles and a podcast about ecological sustainability.  The two articles and the podcast are part of a larger project on ecological sustainability that John is part of,  with researchers from around the globe.

The focus of the research is on sustaining biodiversity in social-ecological systems, and on understanding social and ecological values.  Upcoming events include a webinar organized by the Society for Conservation Biology Europe Section https://conbio.org/groups/sections/europe/activities-fall-2021-webinar-series/ And the 2022 European Congress for Conservation Biology (ECCB) in Prague, Czech Republic: https://www.eccb2022.eu/ The network is always interested in developing new partnerships, so feel free to contact John (john.piccolo@kau.se.) if you are interested.

To read both papers, visit:

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fcosc.2021.761292/abstract and

https://www.mdpi.com/2673-7159/1/4/22

You can listen to the podcast interview via https://open.spotify.com/episode/4gk0dTO4ng0MXf9Whhlnai

The US Forest Service, The Nature Conservancy, and The World Fish Migration Foundation invite you to save the date and register for an exciting upcoming webinar entitled: Removing “Road Dams” in Europe? taking place on 19th January, 2022 from 15:00-18:00 CET. 

This is a free, international webinar that will highlight the need and opportunities to improve road and stream crossings to enhance the biodiversity of rivers across Europe! 

We invite all river and restoration practitioners, policymakers, researchers, and students, as well as road planning, maintenance, design and construction experts to join! 

Confirmed speakers include:

  • Carlos García de Leaniz of Swansea University, Wales | Topic: An overview of Europe’s current policies and research needs
  • Bob Gubernick of the US Forest Service, USA | Topic: Stream simulation principles and applications in the USA
  • Sofia Perä, County Administrative Board of Norrbotten, Sweden | Topic: Culverts in Sweden and lessons from the LIFE REMIBAR project
  • Joshua Royte, Nature Conservancy Maine, USA | Topic: Opening up headwaters in Maine, USA
  • Nat Gillespie, US Forest Service, USA | Topic: What is the problem with culverts and road-crossings?

The full program, which includes speakers from both Europe and the USA, will be released in the coming month. Make sure to register so you don’t miss any important updates! We hope to see you there. 

Sponsor deals for companies: The webinar is additionally open for sponsorship from 6 companies. At this point, we have 5 spots left. For 1,000 euros, companies can show a 30-second commercial video about how they are involved in culvert replacement or the removal of culverts. The logo of sponsors will be shown on Eventbrite, announcement, and conference program. Please contact herman@fishmigration.org for more information about sponsorships. 

Watch Part 2 of the epic aquatic documentary (part of a trilogy) this Sunday, 24 October, 19.00-20.00 on Swedish National TV (SVT2). This epic aquatic trilogy (the first of its kind on Swedish TV) covers three years of filming work by a team of experts. The team while making this documentary in 2019 spent two days with the University of Karlstads’ master course in river Ätran. Find out more on: https://www.svtplay.se/fiskarnas-rike ¨ https://fiskarnasrike.se/

In addition to that, there’s another documentary broadcasted on SVT’s “Kalla fakta” next week (Part 3 THE SEA is broadcast on Sunday 31 October, 19.00-20.00 on SVT2) on “eel conservation”. Watch out for Professor Olle Calles (a lecturer at the University of Karlstad and a member of the River Ecology and management research group) answering very important questions concerning eels.

On Tuesday 28 September 2021, Herman Wanningen, a Ductch aquatic ecologist, entrepreneur specializing in fish migration and water management and founder of the World Fish Migration Foundation and initiator of Dam Removal Europe and Global Swimways, will give a seminar on dam removal as an ecological restoration measure of rivers which have been negatively impacted by the construction and operation of dams. The presentation will highlight how European river managers, inspired by a growing movement, are getting ready to restore rivers by removing dams.

The seminar starts at 13.15 and will be streamed live over Zoom. Contact Olle Calles (olle.calles@kau.se) to receive the zoom link to this seminar.





Professor Lutz Eckstein is involved in a new report led by Tommy Lennartsson (SLU) and co-authored by Jörgen Wissman and Jan Olof Helldin (SLU), published by TRIEKOL, a group of scientists dedicated to applied rail and road ecology.

The report summarizes the role of invasive alien plants (IAP) in the context of infrastructure habitats, focusing on the importance of research for the development of measures for the management and monitoring of invasive species. It elaborates on three problem complexes with IAP:

(A) Effects of IAP on biological diversity and the possibility to reach the Swedish environmental objectives;

(B) The role of the organization and activities of the Swedish Transport Administration and of community valuations, laws and rules for the work with IAP; and

(C) The development and evaluation of measures for control of IAP. For each problem complex, a number of specific questions are formulated highlighting critical knowledge gaps that need to be addressed by scientists.

Download the report here: https://triekol.se/project/kunskapsbrister-invasiver/.

Garden Lupine (Lupinus polyphyllus) native to North America has been classified as an invasive species in Sweden. In Sweden, they are mainly distributed in road verges. A group of researchers at Karlstad University led by Prof. Lutz Eckstein has been tasked with finding efficient management strategies to control their spread. The research aims at finding out when the garden lupine can be controlled most effectively. Watch Prof. Lutz Eckstein and doctoral student Elin Blomqvist talk about this research in a video interview as they collect and examine lupines at different stages of development.

Watch the full video here : https://tinyurl.com/mbnjhmh

Two current members of NRRV, Larry Greenberg and Eva Bergman, and two former members, Johnny Norrgård and Pär Gustafsson, have recently published an overview of 15 years of research on the endemic, large-bodied population of landlocked River Klarälven-Lake Vänern population of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar).

They highlight the major findings from studies of each of the salmon’s life stages and conclude that the Klarälven salmon population is below carrying capacity. Greenberg et al. (2021) suggest measures to increase the number of spawners and downstream passage success, and they also recommend habitat restoration to compensate for losses from, for example, former log-driving activities. They also discuss the ecological and legislative problems that need to be addressed if one wishes to re-establish salmon in Klarälven’s upper reaches in Norway. Managing, conserving and conducting research on this migratory salmonid population has been challenging not only because of the ecosystems’ large size, but also because there is more than one anthropomorphic stressor involved.

Read more about the paper here: https://cdnsciencepub.com/doi/full/10.1139/cjfas-2020-0163

Professor Larry Greenberg, NRRV, and William Ardren, US Fish & Wildlife Service, have co-edited a special issue on nonanadromous Atlantic Salmon in the Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences. The issue is entitled “Conservation, Ecology, and Evolution of Nonanadromous Atlantic Salmon” and has contributions from experts from North America and Europe, consisting of 13 papers. The papers cover four themes, namely (1) ecology, evolution, and behavior, (2) conservation and management (3) improving hatchery programs and (4) re-introduction efforts. Three of the papers come from NRRV researchers;

 1.     https://cdnsciencepub.com/doi/abs/10.1139/cjfas-2019-0271

2.     https://cdnsciencepub.com/doi/full/10.1139/cjfas-2020-0163

3.     https://cdnsciencepub.com/doi/abs/10.1139/cjfas-2020-0155 

Larry Greenberg and William Ardren have written a general overview of the 13 papers in a paper entitled ‘Introduction to “Conservation, Ecology, and Evolution of Nonanadromous Atlantic Salmon”. This can be found at: https://cdnsciencepub.com/doi/full/10.1139/cjfas-2021-0035

Professor Lutz Eckstein is senior author in a new paper in the journal Applied Vegetation Science led by Zahed Shakeri (Kassel University, Germany). Livestock grazing is still an important disturbance in many forest ecosystems of the world. While studies have addressed the general impact of different grazing and light intensities on temperate forest ecosystems, little is known about how the combination of these two factors can affect the species pool and functional diversity of temperate forests.

The authors studied vegetation and environmental data of 104 relevés from Oriental beech forests (Fagus orientalis) of northern Iran. These were assigned to four groups based on their light and grazing intensities. Non-metric multidimensional scaling was used to analyze vegetation compositional relationships among groups. They used nine functional traits related to growth, reproduction, and survival for a total of 147 plant species. Redundancy analysis of community-weighted means was used to determine the response of single traits to disturbance and environmental variables. Both light and grazing intensities significantly affected species pools, single traits, and functional divergence. Suites of trait attributes including hemicryptophytes, therophytes, grass-like, hygromorphic leaves, insect-pollinated, rhizomes, and runner plants were associated with high-light sites. In closed-canopy (low-light) sites, the strong filtering effect of shade resulted in suites of trait attributes including taller plants, macrophanerophytes, scleromorphic leaves, simple leaves, and berry fruits. While high-light sites had a larger species pool, they exhibited less functional diversity. Cattle grazing can mediate the filtering effect of light, and increase functional diversity in both low-light and high-light sites. Conservation measures in this region should acknowledge that moderate traditional cattle grazing combined with individual-tree and group-tree selection in these forests may maintain or even enhance functional diversity in these valuable ecosystems.

Read more about the paper here: https://doi.org/10.1111/avsc.12592.