Forskargruppen Naturresurs rinnande vatten vid Karlstads Universitet söker en eller två projektassistenter för arbete inom två forskningsprojekt på effekterna av dammutrivning. Det första projektet finansieras av KK-stiftelsen och bedrivs i Mörrumsån i samarbete med Sveaskog, Uniper vattenkraft och Power house, medan det andra projektet finansieras direkt av Karlstads universitet och bedrivs i Nianån, Gnarpsån och Enångersån (Hälsingland) i samarbete med Hudiksvalls kommun.

Projektassistenten/assitenternas arbetsuppgifter består i att i samverkan med övriga projektdeltagare genomföra fältaktiviteter som t.ex. telemetristudier på vandrande fisk, elfiske, provtagning av bottenfauna, inventering av växtsamhällen och bidra till att sammanställa insamlad data.

Läs mer om tjänsterna, och ansök, på Karlstads Universitets rekryteringshemsida. Sista ansökningsdag är den 24 maj, och anställningarna är tidsbegränsade. Mer information om projekten finns i bloggartiklarna Dammutrivning och fiskvänliga turbiner (Mörrumsån) och Dammutrivning i Gnarpsån och Nianån.

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Tracking smolts in Huntington River, a tributary to Winooski River.

The accepted version of the scientific article ”Downstream migration and multiple dam passage by Atlantic salmon smolts” by Daniel Nyqvist (Kau), Stephen McCormick (USGS), Larry Greenberg (Kau), William Ardren (US Fish and Wildlife), Eva Bergman (Kau), Olle Calles (Kau), and Theodore Castro-Santos (USGS) is available online at North American Journal of Fisheries Management. The paper presents a study on downstream migration and dam passage of landlocked Atlantic salmon smolts in the River Winooski, a tributary to Lake Champlain.

In the abstract the authors write: ”The purpose of this study was to investigate behavior and survival of radio-tagged wild- and hatchery-reared landlocked Atlantic salmon smolts as they migrated past three hydropower dams equipped with fish bypass solutions in the Winooski River, Vermont, USA. Among hatchery-released smolts, those released early were more likely to initiate migration and did so after less delay than those released late. Once migration was initiated, however, the late-released hatchery smolts migrated at greater speeds. Throughout the river system hatchery released fish performed similarly to wild fish. Dam passage rates varied between the three dams and was highest at the dam where unusually high spill levels occurred throughout the study period. Of the 50 fish that did migrate downstream, only 10% managed to reach the lake. Migration success was low despite the presence of bypass solutions, underscoring the need for evaluations of remedial measures; simply constructing a fishway is not synonymous with providing fish passage.”

Access the paper here or contact the authors.

On Tuesday, 18 April, Victoria Pritchard from the University of Turku, will give a seminar on ”Conservation Genomics of Atlantic Salmon”. The seminar will be given at 13:30 in room 5F416 at Karlstad University.

Victoria has worked in the UK, USA, and Finland, and has published over 20 articles in leading conservation, evolutionary and fisheries journals. Everyone is welcome to attend the seminar.

The new journal The Ecological Citizen aims to advance ecological knowledge, champion earth-centered action and promote ecocentrism in political debate. NRRV member John Piccolo recommends the journal as somewhere you’ll find much interesting reading about human relationships with nature. John is also a co-author of a recently published signable statement in support of ecocentric value that he urges our readers to read and consider signing. Access the statement here: Statement of Commitment to Ecocentrism. 

Also, related to the ecocentric debate, there is an ongoing survey of attitudes to conservation. Learn more and take the survey at www.futureconservation.org.

running_silver”Running Silver – Restoring Atlantic Rivers and Their Great Fish Migration” by John Waldman is a book about the history and future of anadromous fish in the Eastern United States. The books’s main characters are Atlantic salmon, alewife, blueback herring, American shad, striped bass, sea lamprey, Atlantic sturgeon, and American eel. The eel migrates from freshwater to the sea to spawn, whereas the other species typically migrate in the other direction – from feeding areas at sea to spawning areas in freshwater.

The author uses historical records, interviews, scientific literature and personal experiences to tell the story of the migrating fish. He describes the ecology and behavior of the migrating fish but also their great historical abundances, and high social and economic importance. He describes the decline of the populations of migrating fish due to dam building, habitat loss, fishing, and pollution, but also the modern day restoration efforts. The fish are put in a social context with stories about conflicts concerning dams and fish passage dating back several hundred years. Meetings with scientists and manager occur frequently in the book, contributing to the story and providing several inspiring portraits of fish ecologists.

The book is essential reading for anyone working with migrating fish and an important book for those interested in fish and our natural world. The book is a call to action for a future with healthy migrating fish populations. Read a short review here and borrow the book from a  well-stocked library.

 

Short film: The hyporheic zone

Posted by Daniel Nyqvist | Nyheter

The hyporheic zone –  the region beneath the river bottom – is home to a wide range of minute life forms and processes of high importance for the ecology of the river. Learn more in the short film Secret Life of Rivers:

John Piccolo, researcher at Karlstad University, recently published an article in Journal for Conservation of Nature about value in natureThe paper is titledIntrinsic values in nature: Objective good or simply half of an unhelpful dichotomy?”. In the abstract John Piccolo writes: ”Two generations of conservationists and philosophers have built a strong case for intrinsic values in nature; they are the basis of the normative postulates of conservation biology. I argue that the recognition of intrinsic natural value is a fundamental and non-negotiable aspect of an eco-evolutionary worldview. Recently, relational values, “preferences, principles, and virtues associated with relationships”, have been proposed as a third category of values in nature, which may help to resolve the debate between instrumental and intrinsic valuation. By depicting intrinsic values as part of an unhelpful dichotomy between anthropocentric and ecocentric values, the current assessment of relational values fails to adequately account for the modern philosophical view of intrinsic natural value. The recognition of intrinsic natural value is not merely an academic exercise, but rather a vital aspect of conservation of the biosphere; recognition of value entails the obligation to do what is right, i.e., protect the good. Any attempt to reframe the discussion about values and environmental protection through more formal recognition of relational values will need to more clearly address how relational and intrinsic values coexist and how they can jointly form the basis for nature conservation.” 

Read the full paper here.

Tomorrow (Tuesday), February 28, David Aldvén from the University of Gothenburg and Vattenfall AB, will give a seminar titled ”Downstream migration of anadromous brown trout”. David Aldvén finished his PhD with a thesis titled ”Migration in anadromous brown trout”. The frame of his thesis is available online here.

The seminar will be given at 13:30 in room 5F416 on Karlstad University. Everyone is welcome to attend!

Fish Passage 2017 – International Conference on Engineering and Ecohydrology for Fish Passage will be held in Corvallis, Oregon, USA on June 19-21 2017. The confererence ”…promises to be an important international forum for researchers and practitioners to exchange findings and experiences on fish passage issues.

Fish Passage 2017 will be of interest to researchers, educators, practitioners, funders, and regulators who have an interest in advancements in technical fishways, nature-like fishways, stream restoration and stabilization, dam removal, and the myriad of funding, safety, climate change, and other socio-economic related issues surrounding connectivity projects.

This is a three-day conference with concurrent sessions in engineering, biology, management and monitoring techniques. The conference will also feature plenary talks, professional networking opportunities, and a poster session. Independently offered short courses, workshops and tours will be available immediately before and/or after the conference.”

Plenary speakers will be say’ay’ – John Eli Sirois, Futoshi Nakamura, Tony Farrell, Paul T. Jacobson, and Kurt D. Fausch. Read more about the plenary speakers here. Also, pre-conference short courses and post-conference tours are available. Read more about the conference at www.fishpassageconference.com.

 

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